Frequently Asked Questions

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The Implantable Collamer Lens for short-sightedness and astigmatism is a refractive lens also known as a phakic IOL. “Phakic” meaning that the natural lens of the eye is in place, and “IOL” meaning intraocular lens, or a lens inside the eye. The ICL is a posterior chamber implant that is introduced through a small incision in the eye and is placed behind the iris (the coloured part of the eye), and in front of the natural crystalline lens in order to improve your short-sightedness and astigmatism.

The ICL Lens is intended for the correction of moderate to high near-sightedness. ICL and TICL surgery is intended to safely and effectively correct near-sightedness between -0.5 D to -20.0 D, the reduction in near-sightedness up to -20.0 D and treatment of astigmatism from +0.5D to +6D. It is indicated for patients who are at least 21 years of age.

If you have near-sightedness within these ranges, ICL surgery may improve your distance vision without eyeglasses or contact lenses. Because the ICL corrects for distance vision, it does not eliminate the need for reading glasses, you may require them at some point, even if you have never worn them before.

ICL represents an alternative to other refractive surgeries including laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), incisional surgeries, or other means to correct myopia such as contact lenses and eyeglasses.

Patients who are pregnant and nursing and patients with a narrow angle in the front chamber of their eye, because in this case the space for the ICL lens would be too small. The patient education booklet provides an additional list of conditions that should be taken into consideration when making a decision about the ICL procedure.

The key benefit of ICL surgery is the permanent correction or reduction of your near-sightedness, and treatment of astigmatism allowing you to see clearly at long distances without eyeglasses or contact lenses or reduce your dependence upon them. In addition to the improvement of your uncorrected vision (vision without eyeglasses or contact lenses), your best corrected vision (best vision with contact lenses/eye glasses) may be improved.

Follow all of your eye care professional’s instructions before and after implantation of the ICL lens. Take any prescribed medication and schedule all recommended follow-up visits with your eye care professional, usually on an annual basis after the healing of the surgery. Contact your eye care professional immediately if you should experience a problem.

The material is called Collamer® , a collagen co-polymer that contains a small amount of purified collagen which is proprietary to STAAR Surgical; the remainder is made of a similar material to that found in soft contact lenses. It is very biocompatible (does not cause a reaction inside the eye) and stable. It also contains an ultraviolet light filter.

Prior to being placed on the market, ICL was subject to extensive research and development. Today, more than 2,000,000 lenses have been distributed worldwide. In a survey, over 99.4 percent of patients were satisfied with their implant. ICL has a track record of excellent clinical outcomes. Additionally, the ICL lens has been available internationally for over 10 years.

ICL is intended to remain in place without maintenance. The lens can be removed by your eye care professional if needed in the future. If your physician removes the ICL lens, you will lose the benefit of your near-sightedness correction.

No. ICL is positioned behind the iris (the coloured part of the eye), where it is invisible to both you and others. Only your eye care practitioner will be able to tell that vision correction has taken place.

ICL is not typically noticeable after it is implanted. It does not attach to any structures within the eye and does not move around once in place.

The ICL surgery is performed on an outpatient basis which means that the patient has surgery and leaves the same day. The procedure itself usually takes 20-30 minutes or less. The patient will need someone to drive them home on surgery day. A light, topical or local anaesthetic is administered. There is very little discomfort during or after surgery. Some eye drops or medication may be prescribed and a visit with your eye care professional is usually scheduled the day after surgery.

Important Safety Information

EVO & EVO TICL is designed for the correction of moderate to high near-sightedness (-0.5 to -18.0 dioptres (D)) and the reduction of near-sightedness in patients with up to -18 dioptres (D) of near-sightedness with less than or equal to 6.0 dioptres (D) of astigmatism. It is indicated for patients who are 21 to 60 years of age. In order to be sure that your surgeon will use a EVO with the most adequate power for your eye, your near-sightedness should be stable for at least a year before undergoing eye surgery. EVO surgery has been documented to safely and effectively correct near-sightedness between -0.5 dioptres (D) to -18.0 dioptres (D) and partially correct near-sightedness up to -18 dioptres in eyes with up to 6.0(D) of astigmatism. If you have near-sightedness within these ranges, EVO surgery may improve your distance vision without eyeglasses or contact lenses. EVO surgery does not eliminate the need for reading glasses, even if you have never worn them before. The EVO represents an alternative to other refractive surgeries including, laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), incisional surgeries, or other means to correct myopia such as contact lenses and eye glasses. EVO is not intended to correct any astigmatism you may have. Implantation of the EVO is a surgical procedure, and as such, carries potentially serious risks. Please discuss the risks with your eye care provider. The following represent potential complications/adverse events reported in conjunction with refractive surgery in general: conjunctival irritation, acute corneal swelling, persistent corneal swelling, endophthalmitis (total eye infection), significant glare and/or halos around lights, hyphaema (blood in the eye), hypopyon (pus in the eye), eye infection, EVO Visian ICL dislocation, macular oedema, non-reactive pupil, pupillary block glaucoma, severe inflammation of the eye, iritis, uveitis, vitreous loss and corneal transplant. Before considering EVO surgery you should have a complete eye examination and talk with your eye care professional about EVO surgery, especially the potential benefits, risks and complications. You should discuss the time needed for healing after surgery.

References

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References

1Patient Survey, STAAR Surgical ICL Data Registry, 2018

2Sanders D. Vukich JA. Comparison of implantable collamer lens (ICL) and laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for Low Myopia. Cornea. 2006 Dec; 25(10):1139-46.

3Naves, J.S. Carracedo, G. Cacho-Babillo, I. Diadenosine Nucleotid Measurements as Dry-Eye Score in Patients After LASIK and ICL Surgery. Presented at American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) 2012.

4Shoja, MR. Besharati, MR. Dry eye after LASIK for myopia: Incidence and risk factors. European Journal of Ophthalmology. 2007; 17(1): pp. 1-6.

5aLee, Jae Bum et al. Comparison of tear secretion and tear film instability after photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis. Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery , Volume 26 , Issue 9 , 1326 - 1331.

5bParkhurst, G. Psolka, M. Kezirian, G. Phakic intraocular lens implantantion in United States military warfighters: A retrospective analysis of early clinical outcomes of the Visian ICL. J Refract Surg. 2011;27(7):473-481.

*American Refractive Surgery Council